Kilronan Church, Ballymacarbry, Waterford

Kilronan Church (Ruin), Waterford

Kilronan Church, Waterford
Kilronan Church, Waterford

The best bit about having a ‘partner in crime’ on the bike (or in the car) is that you’ve a better chance of spotting something interesting in the landscape that you might have missed if you’d been on your own.

I’ve driven the road from Dungarvan to Clonmel countless times and never noticed the ruins of the church at Kilronan near Ballymacarbry. In fairness, the small stone building is set well back from the road and it would take a fairly perceptive eye to spot it. But en-route back home last weekend, the better half (with better eyesight) pointed it out, and we did a U-turn so that we could take a look.

The tiny gothic-style church is accessed via a gateway fronting onto the main road. There’s a convenient space to park across from it on the opposite side of the road. It’s not possible to view the interior of the building as the windows are blocked up and the doors (one steel and two wooden) are locked. There are a lot of slate tiles in the grass around the church but apart from that it seems structurally fine. The ivy that was threatening to choke the bellcote (as can be seen in a photo on the Buildings of Ireland website) has been cleared and a lot of the overgrowth (also in the photo) has been cut back.

Kilronan Church, Ballymacarbry, Waterford
Doorway, Kilronan Church, Waterford

A plaque on the front of the church displays the year ‘1847’, the year that the church was built. In its day it seated about 40 people and served as an estate church to Glenahiry Lodge. It closed in 1921 and served as a courthouse for some time. I did hear that the building now serves as a storehouse for Waterford County Council roads department, although a piece in the Dungarvan Observer in July 2016 mentions it as being occupied by the Ballymacarbry Scout Group.

Kilronan Church, Waterford

The Teapot Church

According to the Nire Valley website, the church was referred to as ‘The Teapot’ and may have been designed by William Tinsley, the renowned Clonmel Architect, as his daughter was married to the rector of Kilronan.

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